West Las Vegas

History In the 1920s no segregation laws on the books barred black citizens from participating in community life, but with legalization of gambling (1931), repeal of prohibition(1933) and completion of the Boulder Dam (1935) and with tourism on the rise, casino owners began restricting their patrons to whites only. Blacks were allowed to entertain or work in casinos, but they were not allowed to attend shows, live in the casino district, or obtain or renew business licenses.[4] In response to the segregation, blacks in effect created their own Las Vegas that offered everything the real…

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Black History in Nevada

We honor African-Americans, past and present, who have shaped our state. BY MATTHEW B. BROWN | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2014 Photo: Special Collections, University Libraries, University of Nevada, Las Vegas On Monday, January 20, we celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day in Nevada and the rest of the country. King is the recognizable face and symbol of the mid-1900s civil-rights movement, even making a trip to Las Vegas in 1964 in support of his friend and local activist Bob Bailey. In fact, Vegas was so segregated a half a century ago that it…

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North Las Vegas, NV

Highlights Percentage of African American residents: 20.1% African American households make $17,679 less than white households Percentage of African American homeowners: 39% Percentage of New African American residents: 7% Facebook Twitter Google+ LinkedInShare 3. North Las Vegas, NV Population: 226,860 Back in the 1930s, when the Las Vegas strip of casinos and hotels were being built, African Americans were allowed to work in these establishments but were barred from gambling or attending the shows. In response, they built their own hotels and casinos west of town – most notably the Moulin Rouge Hotel, which became the first…

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